Copy
What's new this week, between the issues.
P.Q. Post

In a region that’s experienced a dramatic turnaround but still needs to attract thousands of talented young workers in the next decade, one quality of life puzzle piece remains missing: air quality. Part I of this in-depth series includes an introductory essay by Jeffery Fraser, which puts into context western Pennsylvania’s historic struggles and current problems. Mike Wereschagin documents the top 10 industrial air toxics polluters. And, Fraser again examines the two biggest threats to public health: ozone and PM2.5. Air quality is one of the most critical issues Pittsburgh faces—we hope that, as a citizen, you’ll read these stories and understand this pressing concern. You won’t find better public interest journalism anywhere in town.

On the lighter side (and what isn’t lighter than air pollution?), we have a terrific theater essay on “1984” by Stuart Sheppard, an outstanding poem—“Assisted Living”—by Barbara Edelman, and a fascinating human interest piece by Kate Benz on the voice of Dan Dunlap. For you Greg Curtis fans, this week’s post takes a deeper dive into the new “religion” of climate science. Read on!

—Doug Heuck, Editor

Up in the Air
  ENVIRONMENT  
Up in the Air
by JEFFERY FRASER
Taming air pollution is a century-old challenge in southwestern Pennsylvania. Here is part one in a series examining where we are today and where the region is heading.
Top 10 Polluters
  ENVIRONMENT  
The Region’s Top 10 Air Polluters
by MIKE WERESCHAGIN
Southwestern Pennsylvania remains home to factories, power plants and steel mills that release millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into the air.
The Voice of...Living
  AMERICAN SPIRIT  
The Voice of... Living
by KATE BENZ
Dan Dunlap: A short, skinny guy with a voice like three ice-cold rocks swimming in aged whiskey. No, make that scotch.
Assisted Living
  PQ POEM  
Assisted Living
by BARBARA EDELMAN
Her phone is like a cordless baby. Her children / are a blur of programmed digits. Each week she / learns new rituals to survive, from toothbrush /  to spoon. Her softball glove...
Reflections on "1984"
  THE HAMLET MACHINE  
Reflections on “1984”
in 2017

by STUART SHEPPARD
The Orwellian ethos in “1984” and the play of the same name, performed by Prime Stage Theatre, has become foundational to our societal subconsciousness.
Loose Change, Part VIII
  OPINION  
Loose Change, Part VIII
by GREG CURTIS
Scientists worrying about their reputations results in science looking a lot less like science, with its skepticism, rigor and careful analysis, and starts looking a lot more like religion.

See something a friend would like?

Send them this edition of Pittsburgh Quarterly This Week.
SHARE
Spring 2017 issue: On newsstands now
Pittsburgh Quarterly
FORWARD TO A FRIEND    |    SUBSCRIBE TO THE MAGAZINE
Copyright © 2017 Pittsburgh Quarterly, All rights reserved.

412.779.5865

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list